Top 100+ Great Gatsby Quotes

In this list we have gathered the top 100 Great Gatsby quotes for you to read. The novel of Great Gatsby is almost a century old, written in 1925 by American author called F. Scott Fitzgerald. The novel is about some charming characters, such as Jay Gatsby and Daisy Buchanan, living on the prosperous Long Island in fictional small towns called West Egg and East Egg. A blockbuster movie has been also produced with the same name in 2013, with two more films produced earlier in 1949 and 1974. Whether you’re a fan of the movies or the novel, you’re likely to find some genius quotes on this list! The list has been organized with the most popular quotes seen in this movie on the top, as the list is ranked by community votes. Feel free to vote your own favourite quote in order to help it move up the list!

  1. 1
    The Great Gatsby

    “So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  2. 2
    The Great Gatsby

    “And so with the sunshine and the great bursts of leaves growing on the trees, just as things grow in fast movies, I had that familiar conviction that life was beginning over again with the summer.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  3. 3
    The Great Gatsby

    “I was within and without, simultaneously enchanted and repelled by the inexhaustible variety of life.” ― Fitzgerald F. Scott, The Great Gatsby

  4. 4
    The Great Gatsby

    “He smiled understandingly-much more than understandingly. It was one of those rare smiles with a quality of eternal reassurance in it, that you may come across four or five times in life. It faced–or seemed to face–the whole eternal world for an instant, and then concentrated on you with an irresistible prejudice in your favor. It understood you just as far as you wanted to be understood, believed in you as you would like to believe in yourself, and assured you that it had precisely the impression of you that, at your best, you hoped to convey.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  5. 5
    The Great Gatsby

    “You see I usually find myself among strangers because I drift here and there trying to forget the sad things that happened to me.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  6. 6
    The Great Gatsby

    “They’re a rotten crowd’, I shouted across the lawn. ‘You’re worth the whole damn bunch put together.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  7. 7
    The Great Gatsby

    “Ah,” she cried, “you look so cool.”

    Their eyes met, and they stared together at each other, alone in space. With an effort she glanced down at the table.

    You always look so cool,” she repeated.

    She had told him that she loved him, and Tom Buchanan saw.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  8. 8
    The Great Gatsby

    “She looked at me and laughed pointlessly. Then she flounced over to the dog, kissed it with ecstasy, and swept into the kitchen, implying that a dozen chefs awaited her orders there.”  ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  9. 9
    The Great Gatsby

    “As we passed over the dark bridge her wan face fell lazily against my coat’s shoulder and the formidable stroke of thirty died away with the reassuring pressure of her hand.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  10. 10
    The Great Gatsby

    “A pause; it endured horribly.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  11. 11
    The Great Gatsby

    “She told me it was a girl, and so I turned my head away and wept. ‘All right,’ I said, ‘I’m glad it’s a girl. And I hope she’ll be a fool – that’s the best thing a girl can be in this world, a beautiful little fool.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  12. 12
    The Great Gatsby

    “You’re very polite, but I belong to another generation” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  13. 13
    The Great Gatsby

    “I hope she’ll be a fool — that’s the best thing a girl can be in this world, a beautiful little fool.”― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  14. 14
    The Great Gatsby

    “Angry, and half in love with her, and tremendously sorry, I turned away.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  15. 15
    The Great Gatsby

    “And I like large parties. They’re so intimate. At small parties there isn’t any privacy.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  16. 16
    The Great Gatsby

    “I wasn’t actually in love, but I felt a sort of tender curiosity.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  17. 17
    The Great Gatsby

    “Let us learn to show our friendship for a man when he is alive and not after he is dead.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  18. 18
    The Great Gatsby

    “There are only the pursued, the pursuing, the busy and the tired.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  19. 19
    The Great Gatsby

    “In my younger and more vulnerable years my father gave me some advice that I’ve been turning over in my mind ever since.
    “Whenever you feel like criticizing any one,” he told me, “just remember that all the people in this world haven’t had the advantages that you’ve had.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  20. 20
    The Great Gatsby

    “Life starts all over again when it gets crisp in the fall.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  21. 21
    The Great Gatsby

    “Reserving judgements is a matter of infinite hope.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  22. 22
    The Great Gatsby

    “Can’t repeat the past?…Why of course you can!” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  23. 23
    The Great Gatsby

    “In his blue gardens men and girls came and went like moths among the whisperings and the champagne and the stars.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  24. 24
    The Great Gatsby

    “I couldn’t forgive him or like him, but I saw that what he had done was, to him, entirely justified. It was all very careless and confused. They were careless people, Tom and Daisy—they smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money or their vast carelessness, or whatever it was that kept them together, and let other people clean up the mess they had made.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  25. 25
    The Great Gatsby

    “There must have been moments even that afternoon when Daisy tumbled short of his dreams — not through her own fault, but because of the colossal vitality of his illusion. It had gone beyond her, beyond everything. He had thrown himself into it with a creative passion, adding to it all the time, decking it out with every bright feather that drifted his way. No amount of fire or freshness can challenge what a man will store up in his ghostly heart.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  26. 26
    The Great Gatsby

    “It’s a great advantage not to drink among hard drinking people.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  27. 27
    The Great Gatsby

    “All I kept thinking about, over and over, was ‘You can’t live forever; you can’t live forever.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  28. 28
    The Great Gatsby

    “So we drove on toward death through the cooling twilight.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  29. 29
    The Great Gatsby

    “His heart beat faster and faster as Daisy’s white face came up to his own. He knew that when he kissed this girl, and forever wed his unutterable visions to her perishable breath, his mind would never romp again like the mind of God. So he waited, listening for a moment longer to the tuning fork that had been struck upon a star. Then he kissed her. At his lips’ touch she blossomed like a flower and the incarnation was complete.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  30. 30
    The Great Gatsby

    “I felt a haunting loneliness sometimes, and felt it in others–young clerks in the dusk, wasting the most poignant moments of night and life.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  31. 31
    The Great Gatsby

    “No amount of fire or freshness can challenge what a man will store up in his ghostly heart.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  32. 32
    The Great Gatsby

    “It takes two to make an accident.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  33. 33
    The Great Gatsby

    “And as I sat there brooding on the old, unknown world, I thought of Gatsby’s wonder when he first picked out the green light at the end of Daisy’s dock. He had come a long way to this blue lawn, and his dream must have seemed so close that he could hardly fail to grasp it. He did not know that it was already behind him, somewhere back in that vast obscurity beyond the city, where the dark fields of the republic rolled on under the night.

    Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that’s no matter—to-morrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther. . . . And one fine morning——

    So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  34. 34
    The Great Gatsby

    “He looked at her the way all women want to be looked at by a man.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  35. 35
    The Great Gatsby

    “If personality is an unbroken series of successful gestures, then there was something gorgeous about him” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  36. 36
    The Great Gatsby

    “He looked at her the way all women want to be looked at by a man.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  37. 37
    The Great Gatsby

    “If personality is an unbroken series of successful gestures, then there was something gorgeous about him” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  38. 38
    The Great Gatsby

    “He looked at her the way all women want to be looked at by a man.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  39. 39
    The Great Gatsby

    “If personality is an unbroken series of successful gestures, then there was something gorgeous about him” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  40. 40
    The Great Gatsby

    “Every one suspects himself of at least one of the cardinal virtues, and this is mine: I am one of the few honest people that I have ever known.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  41. 41
    The Great Gatsby

    “A stirring warmth flowed from her, as if her heart was trying to come out to you concealed in one of those breathless, thrilling words.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  42. 42
    The Great Gatsby

    “I thought of Gatsby’s wonder when he first picked out the green light at the end of Daisy’s dock. He had come a long way to this lawn and his dream must have seemed so close that he could hardly fail to grasp it. He did not know that it was already behind him. [- Nick Carroway]” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  43. 43
    The Great Gatsby

    “It was one of those rare smiles with a quality of eternal reassurance in it, that you may come across four or five times in life.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  44. 44
    The Great Gatsby

    “Look at that,’ she whispered, and then after a moment: ‘I’d like to just get one of those pink clouds and put you in it and push you around.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  45. 45
    The Great Gatsby

    “Each night he added to the pattern of his fancies until drowsiness closed down upon some vivid scene with an oblivious embrace. For awhile these reveries provided an outlet for his imagination; they were a satisfactory hint of the unreality of reality, a promise that the rock of the world was founded securely on a fairy’s wing.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  46. 46
    The Great Gatsby

    “Thirty–the promise of a decade of loneliness, a thinning list of single men to know, a thinning brief-case of enthusiasm, thinning hair.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  47. 47
    The Great Gatsby

    “Once in a while I go off on a spree and make a fool of myself, but I always come back, and in my heart I love her all the time. – The Great Gatsby.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  48. 48
    The Great Gatsby

    “For a moment the last sunshine fell with romantic affection upon her glowing face; her voice compelled me forward breathlessly as I listened – then the glow faded, each light deserting her with lingering regret, like children leaving a pleasant street at dusk.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  49. 49
    The Great Gatsby

    “His dream must have seemed so close that he could hardly fail to grasp it. He did not know that it was already behind him.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  50. 50
    The Great Gatsby

    “What’ll we do with ourselves this afternoon?” cried Daisy, “and the day after that, and the next thirty years?” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  51. 51
    The Great Gatsby

    “Gatsby turned out all right at the end; it is what preyed on Gatsby, what foul dust floated in the wake of his dreams that temporarily closed out my interest in the abortive sorrows and short-winded elations of men.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  52. 52
    The Great Gatsby

    “I am one of the few honest people that I have ever known.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  53. 53
    The Great Gatsby

    “The city seen from the Queensboro Bridge is always the city seen for the first time, in its first wild promise of all the mystery and the beauty in the world.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  54. 54
    The Great Gatsby

    It was the kind of voice that the ear follows up and down, as if each speech is an arrangement of notes that will never be played again.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  55. 55
    The Great Gatsby

    “The exhilarating ripple of her voice was a wild tonic in the rain.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  56. 56
    The Great Gatsby

    “They were careless people, Tom and Daisy- they smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money or their vast carelessness or whatever it was that kept them together, and let other people clean up the mess they had made.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  57. 57
    The Great Gatsby

    “She was feeling the pressure of the world outside and she wanted to see him and feel his presence beside her and be reassured that she was doing the right thing after all.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  58. 58
    The Great Gatsby

    “Life is much more successfully looked at from a single window.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  59. 59
    The Great Gatsby

    “If it wasn’t for the mist we could see your home across the bay,” said Gatsby. “You always have a green light that burns at the end of your dock.”
    Daisy put her arm through his abruptly but he seemed absorbed in what he had just said. Possibly it had occurred to him that the colossal significance of that light had now vanished forever. Compared to the great distance that had separated him from Daisy it had seemed very near to him, almost touching her. It had seemed as close as a star to the moon. Now it was again a green light on a dock. His count of enchanted things had diminished by one.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  60. 60
    The Great Gatsby

    “She’s got an indiscreet voice,” I remarked. “It’s full of–” I hesitated.

    “Her voice is full of money,” he said suddenly.

    That was it. I’d never understood before. It was full of money–that was the inexhaustible charm that rose and fell in it, the jingle of it, the cymbals’ song of it.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  61. 61
    The Great Gatsby

    “Her face was sad and lovely with bright things in it, bright eyes and a bright passionate mouth, but there was an excitement in her voice that men who had cared for her found difficult to forget: a singing compulsion, a whispered “Listen,” a promise that she had done gay, exciting things just a while since and that there were gay, exciting things hovering in the next hour.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  62. 62
    The Great Gatsby

    “If that was true he must have felt that he had lost the old warm world, paid a high price for living too long with a single dream. He must have looked up at an unfamiliar sky through frightening leaves and shivered as he found what a grotesque thing a rose is and how raw the sunlight was upon the scarcely created grass. A new world, material without being real, where poor ghosts, breathing dreams like air, drifted fortuitously about…like that ashen, fantastic figure gliding toward him through the amorphous trees.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  63. 63
    The Great Gatsby

    “Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that’s no matter–tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther…. And one fine morning– So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  64. 64
    The Great Gatsby

    “Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that’s no matter – to-morrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther … And one fine morning —” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  65. 65
    The Great Gatsby

    “I’ve been drunk for about a week now, and I thought it might sober me up to sit in a library.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  66. 66
    The Great Gatsby

    “Do you ever wait for the longest day of the year and then miss it? I always wait for the longest day of the year and then miss it!” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  67. 67
    The Great Gatsby

    She had told him that she loved him, and Tom Buchanan saw.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  68. 68
    The Great Gatsby

    “There is no confusion like the confusion of a simple mind…” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  69. 69
    The Great Gatsby

    “This isn’t just an epigram — life is much more successfully looked at from a single window, after all.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  70. 70
    The Great Gatsby

    “Involuntarily I glanced seaward and distinguished nothing except a single green light, minute and far away, that might have been the end of a dock. When I looked once more for Gatsby, he had vanished, and I was alone again in the unquiet darkness.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  71. 71
    The Great Gatsby

    “You can’t live forever; you can’t live forever.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  72. 72
    The Great Gatsby

    “The wind had blown off, leaving a loud, bright night, with wings beating in the treas and a persistent organ sound as the full bellows of the earth blew the frogs full of life.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  73. 73
    The Great Gatsby

    “I read somewhere that the sun’s getting hotter every year,” said Tom genially. “It seems that pretty soon the earth’s going to fall into the sun–or wait a minute–it’s just the opposite–the sun’s getting colder every year.” 1925” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  74. 74
    The Great Gatsby

    “For Daisy was young and her artificial world was redolent of orchids and pleasant, cheerful snobbery and orchestras which set the rhythm of the year, summing up the sadness and suggestiveness of life in new tunes. All night the saxophones wailed the hopeless comment o the ‘Beale Street Blues’ while a hundred pairs of golden and silver slippers shuffled the shiny dust. At the grey tea hour there were always rooms that throbbed incessantly with this low, sweet fever, while fresh faces drifted here and there like rose petals blown by the sad horns around the floor.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  75. 75
    The Great Gatsby

    “The bottle of whiskey–a second one–was now in constant demand by all present, excepting Catherine who ‘felt just as good on nothing at all.’ Tom rang for the janitor and sent him for some celebrated sandwiches, which were a complete supper in themselves. I wanted to get out and walk eastward toward the park through the soft twilight but each time I tried to go I became entangled in some wild strident argument which pulled me back, as if with ropes, into my chair. Yet high over the city our line of yellow windows must have contributed their share of human secrecy to the casual watcher in the darkening streets, and I was him too, looking up and wondering. I was within and without, simultaneously enchanted and repelled by the inexhaustible variety of life.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  76. 76
    The Great Gatsby

    “I’ve been everywhere and seen everything and done everything…Sophisticated — God, I’m sophisticated! (Daisy)” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  77. 77
    The Great Gatsby

    “He came back from France when Tom and Daisy were still on their wedding trip, and made a miserable but irresistible journey to Louisville on the last of his army pay. He stayed there a week, walking the streets where their footsteps had clicked together through the November night and revisiting the out-of-the-way places to which they had driven in her white car. Just as Daisy’s house had always seemed to him more mysterious and gay than other houses so his idea of the city itself, even though she was gone from it, was pervaded with a melancholy beauty.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  78. 78
    The Great Gatsby

    “The truth was that Jay Gatsby, of West Egg, Long Island, sprang from his Platonic conception of himself. He was a son of God—a phrase which, if it means anything, means just that—and he must be about His Father’s Business, the service of a vast, vulgar and meretricious beauty.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  79. 79
    The Great Gatsby

    “Only Gatsby, the man who gives his name to this book, was exempt from my reaction — Gatsby, who represented everything for which I have an unaffected scorn … No — Gatsby turned out all right in the end; it was what prayed on Gatsby, what foul dust floated in the wake of his dreams that temporarily closed out my interest in the abortive sorrows and the short-winded elations of men.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  80. 80
    The Great Gatsby

    “interested, I mean, with that intense personal interest to which every one has some vague right at the end” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  81. 81
    The Great Gatsby

    “His life had been confused and disordered since then, but if he could once return to a certain starting place and go over it all slowly, he could find out what that thing was” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  82. 82
    The Great Gatsby

    “I was looking at it again, through Daisy’s eyes.
    It is invariably saddening to look through new eyes at things upon which you have expended your own powers of adjustment.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  83. 83
    The Great Gatsby

    “I always watch for the longest day in the year and then I miss it.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  84. 84
    The Great Gatsby

    “It made no difference to me. Dishonesty in a woman is a thing you never blame deeply.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  85. 85
    The Great Gatsby

    “While the rain continued it had seemed like the murmur of their voices, rising and swelling a little now and then with gusts of emotion.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  86. 86
    The Great Gatsby

    “A sudden emptiness seemed to flow now from the windows and the great doors, endowing with complete isolation the figure of the host, who stood on the porch, his hand up in a formal gesture of farewell.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  87. 87
    The Great Gatsby

    “Standing behind him, Michaelis saw with a shock that he was looking at the eyes of Doctor T. J. Eckleburg, which had just emerged, pale and enormous, from the dissolving night. “God sees everything,” repeated Wilson.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  88. 88
    The Great Gatsby

    “One autumn night, five years before, they had been walking down the street when the leaves were falling, and they came to a place where there were no trees and the sidewalk was white with moonlight. They stopped here and turned toward each other. Now it was a cool night with that mysterious excitement in it which comes at the two changes of the year. The quiet lights in the houses were humming out into the darkness and there was a stir and bustle among the stars. Out of the corner of his eye Gatsby saw that the blocks of the sidewalks really formed a ladder and mounted to a secret place above the trees – he could climb to it, if he climbed alone, and once there he could suck on the pap of life, gulp down the imcomparable milk of wonder.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  89. 89
    The Great Gatsby

    “We drove over to Fifth Avenue, so warm and soft, almost pastoral, on the summer Sunday afternoon that I wouldn’t have been surprised to see a great flock of white sheep turn the corner.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  90. 90
    The Great Gatsby

    “Quando te sentires com vontade de criticar alguém, lembra-te disto: nem todos tiveram neste mundo as vantagens que tu tiveste.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  91. 91
    The Great Gatsby

    “We walked through a high hallway into a bright rosy-colored space, fragilely bound into the house by French windows at either end. The windows were ajar and gleaming white against the fresh grass outside that seemed to grow a little way into the house. A breeze blew through the room, blew curtains in at one end and out the other like pale flags, twisting them up toward the frosted wedding-cake of the ceiling, and then rippled over the wine-colored rug, making a shadow on it as wind does on the sea.
    The only completely stationary object in the room was an enormous couch on which two young women were buoyed up as though upon an anchored balloon. They were both in white, and their dresses were rippling and fluttering as if they had just been blown back in after a short flight around the house. I must have stood for a few moments listening to the whip and snap of the curtains and the groan of a picture on the wall. …” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  92. 92
    The Great Gatsby

    “They were careless people, Tom and Daisy–they smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money or their vast carelessness, or whatever it was that kept them together, and let other people clean up the mess they had made.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  93. 93
    The Great Gatsby

    “You can’t repeat the past.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  94. 94
    The Great Gatsby

    “I think that voice held him most, with its fluctuating, feverish warmth, because it couldn’t be over-dreamed—that voice was a deathless song.” ― F Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  95. 95
    The Great Gatsby

    “He looked around him wildly, as if the past were lurking here in the shadow of his house, just out of reach of his hand.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  96. 96
    The Great Gatsby

    “Benny McClenahan arrived always with four girls. They were never quite the same ones in physical person but they were so identical one with another that it inevitably seemed they had been there before. I have forgotten their names — Jaqueline, I think, or else Consuela or Gloria or Judy or June, and their last names were either the melodious names of flowers and months or the sterner ones of the great American capitalists whose cousins, if pressed, they would confess themselves to be.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  97. 97
    The Great Gatsby

    “I looked back at my cousin who began to ask me questions in her low, thrilling voice. It was the kind of voice that the ear follows up and down as if each speech is an arrangement of notes that will never be played again. Her face was sad and lovely with bright things in it, bright eyes and a bright passionate mouth–but there was an excitement in her voice that men who had cared for her found difficult to forget: a singing compulsion, a whispered ‘Listen,’ a promise that she had done gay, exciting things just a while since and that there were gay, exciting things hovering in the next hour.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  98. 98
    The Great Gatsby

    “In two weeks it’ll be the longest day in the year.’ She looked at us all radiantly. ‘Do you always watch for the longest day of the year and then miss it? I always watch for the longest day in the year and then miss it.’

    ‘We ought to plan something,’ yawned Miss Baker, sitting down at the table as if she were getting into bed.

    ‘All right,’ said Daisy. ‘What’ll we plan?’ She turned to me helplessly. ‘What do people plan?” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  99. 99
    The Great Gatsby

    “This is a valley of ashes – a fantastic farm where ashes grow like wheat into ridges and hills and grotesque gardens; where ashes take the form of houses and chimneys and riding smoke and, finally, with a transcendent effort, of men who move dimly and already crumbling through the powdery air.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  100. 100
    The Great Gatsby

    “I was flattered that she wanted to speak to me, because of all the older girls I admired her most. She asked me if I was going to the Red Cross and make bandages. I was. Well, then, would I tell them that she couldn’t come that day? The officer looked at Daisy while she was speaking, in a way that every young girl wants to be looked at sometime, and because it seemed romantic to me I have remembered the incident ever since. His name was Jay Gatsby and I didn’t lay eyes on him again for over four years–even after I’d met him on Long Island I didn’t realize it was the same man.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

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